CLOTHING: LGBT Clothing


#44

Actually, hate crimes are unfortunately not uncommon and neither is intolerance. LGBT people are now the most targeted group, statistically, alongside people of African descent. I’m not sure why you’re trying to gloss over that fact and make it seem not so bad. Hate crimes are much more prevalent than non-hate crimes, even in the western world. In fact, most homeless people are homeless because they were disowned for being gay.

Here are some statistics (courtesy of the charity Stonewall):

  • One in five LGBT people (21 per cent) have experienced a hate crime or incident due to their sexual orientation and/or gender identity in the last 12 months
  • Two in five trans people (41 per cent) have experienced a hate crime or incident because of their gender identity in the last 12 months and one in six LGB people, who aren’t trans (16 per cent), have experienced a hate crime or incident due to their sexual orientation in the same period
  • The number of lesbian, gay and bisexual people who have experienced a hate crime or incident in the last year because of their sexual orientation has risen by 78 per cent from nine per cent in 2013 to 16 per cent in 2017
  • Four in five LGBT people (81 per cent) who experienced a hate crime or incident didn’t report it to the police
  • Three in 10 LGBT people (29 per cent) avoid certain streets because they do not feel safe there as an LGBT person
  • More than a third of LGBT people (36 per cent) say they don’t feel comfortable walking down the street while holding their partner’s hand. This increases to three in five gay men (58 per cent)
  • One in 10 LGBT people (10 per cent) have experienced homophobic, biphobic or transphobic abuse online directed towards them personally in the last month. This number increases to one in four for trans people (26 per cent) directly experiencing transphobic abuse online in the last month

Can you still really tell me that a shirt saying “love is love” is so bad?


#46

Res, where do I begin…?

First of all, again I must say it isn’t rare at all, yes, in first-world countries! Stonewall is a UK charity, and all those statistics were about the UK. I wish what you believe to be true was actually the truth, too, but my own father being a homophobe (as in, telling me that being how I am is unnatural and fake-- obviously not as bad as some have it, but it still hurts) is a bit of a wake-up call to me.

And there’s a difference between being accepted anywhere- which as you said, no one can really be- and being completely kicked out and abused before you’ve even said a word in certain places. There’s a HUGE difference between getting the cold shoulder from some because you upset them and getting death threats for something you can’t help.

I don’t really understand what you’re trying to say about POC but I think you’re playing to the stereotypes.

And, back to the statistics, the ones you were referencing were about experiencing a hate crime in the last 12 months, not your whole life. And hates crimes are DEFINITELY not jokes. They most often take the form of physical violence (including murder) and rape.

Hate crimes are because people think we’re shoving things down their throats? Please, pride parades, which only happen in a place once a year for a few hours, are just a reminder to people who’re being bullied because they’re gay, getting death threats because they’re gay, been thrown out on the streets because they’re gay… that everything is OK and there IS hope. And even if I did shout, as you seem to understand it, near someone, saying “you don’t listen to me”, how would that excuse them murdering me? How would that make it my fault?

I got the statistic from a UK LGBT charity that specialises in surveying and supplying resources to schools. And they survey LGBT young adults and ask if they experienced what would be defined as a hate crime, and if they reported it. Trust me, it’s no joke. And I’m sorry you got slapped, but that’s different to a hate crime. Hate crimes are triggered by nothing other than the victim’s being there and most often leave the victim badly beaten up (or worse). And it’s not discrimination if you did something to purposefully make them reasonably upset.

And again, Res, there’s a terrible difference between not wanting to hold your partner’s hand and running the risk of getting beaten up for holding your partners hand, the latter of which was the context for the statistic.

And again: there’s a difference between people being upset with you because you purposely upset them and people being physically violent with you for no reason.

Have a good day.


#47

Sorry, I didn’t read all of this. I’ve just had enough. I’m just under a bit of personal attack from someone at the moment and can’t read all of this. I am going to drop it. I wrote that message last night and got up in the morning, I’m sorry if I offended anyone. This is my viewpoint on the matter, plain and simple so everyone can see that I’m not a bad person, as everyone has been calling me (not you directly but some other people): That I’m a one sided person that doesn’t see other people’s perspectives. And I’m just sick of it. All I try to do is state my opinion and all I receive is backlash. This is why I don’t go onto the internet. I’m probably not going to say anything else about my opinion anymore. But my viewpoint is: Not everything can be chalked up to hate crimes. Everyone dies, yes there are hate crimes, but not as many as you may think. People like to exaggerate numbers. And a lot of homeless people, you must understand, have plenty of support and shelters, but a lot of them have mental problems, reasons why there are on the street. And I’m not going to debate more on that topic. That’s out of the way.

I’m not trying to be mean. And like I continue to say, I would like some new t-shirts, but if they are for the purpose of being lazy and not wanting to write a character, then I will not support this.

This is all I have to say,
Cheers,
R.


#48

Youre not under attack hunny :hugs: I agree with u on the clothing thing just not on the rest, youre entitled to your own opinion.


#49

I understand and, though I don’t really agree with your views, I respect your opinion.

I wish you luck in further life,
Deliyah. x


#50

I wish both you and @Chida a good life too, everyone is entitled to their own opinion. I just can’t find it in me to debate right now, sorry I seem like I’m suddenly backing out. And I am sorry if I offended anyone.

Cheers to everyone,
R.


#51

No need to apologize. This is how you see things and i respect that, i know that youre not a bad person. :hugs:


#52

So. Uhm. Yeah? Okay?

I’d still like cute LGBT+ :rainbow_flag: T-Shirts…

P.S - Writing well developed characters should be in every story. - LGBT+ has cliché’s just like every other thing. We can’t just refuse to give the community something due to someone writing something stereotypical. There’s always gunna be someone who’s gunna write a cliché character.

It’s about having the options available. If I wanna make a spectacular pride event. Then, yinno, I’d kinda like the option to do so. :no_mouth:


#53

honestly agree! if they ever come out with these shirts i hope people don’t put them in their stories to make it more diverse by putting A T SHIRT. the shirt would be a nice accessory but as you said it shouldn’t be used just so authors can be lazy. totally agree with you :sweat_smile:


#54

While I do have to agree that putting a character in a t-shirt won’t make them representative of the community and having to show their personality through a t-shirt is quite a lazy move, I support this idea.
I support this idea because I know people who actually wear pride clothes and I would do that too on occasion,s if I were out of the closet. Sometimes people just wear pride clothes, not because they want to tell the world who they are or what they think, but because they are proud of themselves, and having the OPTION for some characters to wear them.

EDIT: Another reason for wearing pride clothes and/or accessories can be the relief people feel to know they belong somewhere and that they are not “broken” or “wrong” or “disgusting”. It’s a somewhat calming thing to wear something that reminds you that you are valid.


#55

This is such a great idea! Episode does a pretty good job of including LGBT in most of their stories. I would love some outfits


#56

While I’m all for adding in clothing for all the LGBT+ folk out there (pansexual trans man myself), I feel like it would just be a cheap way for authors to add in diversity. Instead of fleshing out a character as LGBT+, they just add in a background character with a shirt on.
I see it mostly being used as something to loosely ‘diversify’ their story by adding in a few background characters with rainbow heart shirts and ‘love is love’ type things. There should be well-structured characters that just happen to be LGBT+, not characters who’s sole identity lies around them being LGBT+.


#57

I agree! :slight_smile:


#58

i agree but they should still have these clothings for authors who are actually wanting to feature diversity. like maybe a protest or something like that, we deserve these types of clothes.
if an author thinks it’s diverse to add in a bg character with an LGBT+ shirt then it’s their own fault and nobody will take their diversity level seriously, we shouldn’t not have such cute LGBT quotes on our clothing cause some people are too lazy to make their own LGBT chars


#59

I agree with this idea!


#61

Ok, so I’ve been reading through the past comments and they are VERY opinionated. But, I agree with all the opinions. It would be a very lazy move to slap a shirt on someone and say that makes the story diverse. Plus, I don’t see people wearing these shirts on a regular basis. But, it is important for LGBTQ+ to be represented, not ignored. I do hate the stereotypes mostly because my best friend is pansexual, she is nothing like the stereotypes and she would never wear that clothing. But this would help raise awareness to other people that we do care. Yes, there are a lot of hate crimes but this has nothing to do with them, besides the fact that people might be cyber bullied for putting this in their story. That is the one topic I have never seen but I know it will happen. I look at a lot of comments for other stories and I see a lot if hate, sometimes directed at the LGBTQ+ community. Honestly, this will have many consequences no matter what happens. But I would LOVE seeing these T-shirts


#62

We have different opinions about some things, but I’d never attack you for that. :heart:

Be strong :muscle:


#63

T-shirt slogans as a way to signify that a character is LGBT? Nope. But an LGBT character wearing a silly T-shirt once in a while? I’m down with that.


#64

I think that LGBTQ representation is important. However instead of pasting our slogans on tshirts, maybe they could add some more androgynous clothing items to the wardrobe and open up the character customization to include body types.


#65

My opinion is that if an author is going to use LGBT+ clothing to take the cheap route to diversity, they were going to take the cheapest route they could find to begin with. Well-written diverse characters aren’t at risk by adding LGBT+ clothing, only poorly-written ones. A good writer won’t take that shortcut - and personally, I wouldn’t want to read stories by those who would take the shortcut anyway.

I would love to have some LGBT shirts, especially aro/ace (aromantic/asexual) ones. I’m afraid to wear one in real life, so it would be kind of cool to write a story about someone who isn’t. On top of that, this could give the ability to include Pride events in stories, or express what it’s like to not be able to hide your diversity in every day life and become a target. I’m very pro-the addition of LGBT clothes.