English 🇬🇧 Characters! UPDATED

Great information. Thanks!

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Thank you very much for this thread! I might possibly make a story, including these type of characters; so I’m glad this exists so I’m not stereotyping… :sweat_smile:

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Yeah, most people wear jeans although leggings are becoming quite popular atm in my town

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Ohh right sorry
So I don’t know that much but I don’t think so. We have a prime minister and party that gets voted for then the Royal leader (currently Queen Elizabeth) it is about family.

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Ooh yeah do love leggings :joy:

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Thank you for making this! :heart: super helpful

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I have a British character in my story. She only speaks 2 lines of dialogue, why am I reading this? XD

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thank you for this :raised_hands:t4:, as i’m often told i don’t sound posh as if it’s a british priority :joy:.

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with English politics there is the house of commons, there are 650 seats. When there is an election for example, if the labour party win 5 seats, conservatives win 2 seats and UKIP win 1 seats. this means the labour party has the majority of seats and when it comes to decisions the party that has the most seats have the majority overall on the decisions. (hopefully i haven’t confused you. As well as when deciding an outcome of something , for example the latest big political decision was made on free school meals for children in school, for example say in the conservative party all parties will get a separate answer of what they are in favour of, even though they come from the same party doesn’t mean they have to choose the same option but in the school meal debate the conservatives hold the majority of seats, within the seats post people voted to not have free school meals anymore. so the decision was to cut the funding for it. also you vote or seats in the house of commons and the prime minister separately. I hope this helps, i am not too into politics but i do keep my head into some topics and vote. Also to relate it to America, the conservative party would be for like Donald trump and the labour party would be for Biden

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As an English person, I claim this.

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But with the important tests, SATS are not important at all. Your GCSE’s can be, to get into a good sixth form, and your A Levels are important for uni. Uni exams are important as well for resumes, etc.

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Thanks for the tag! :blush:
I’m gonna bookmark this just in case, thanks :wink:

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True. They are just the only other bigger tests that I could think of :joy: :sob:

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I have a question! I’m also english myself but I’m curious on where people call nursery ‘preschool’? I thought that was an American thing? I’ve never heard an English person call it that ever lol.

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Neither have I!

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yea, it was always called nursery as far as i know.🥲

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We also have £2 coins :rofl:

Where I am, we don’t have preschool, and it’s not a term that I’ve heard used on this side of the pond, more of an American term I believe.

Here, we have Playgroup that is usually for children between 3 and 5.
Then there’s primary school, and first year there is Reception. (Which isn’t compulsory to attend I believe). Then Years 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6 which were split into Key Stages back when I was in school (could have changed now as it’s been a while :rofl:.

Year 7 is the start of secondary school, and in year 9 you choose classes that you want to take the next year for your GCSE’s. You have core classes which are compulsory to take… e.g. Maths, English, one Science (Chem, Bio, Physics), one language.

There is also the chance to do work experience at this time. Where you do a day at college, and one at work experience, and continue with schooling.
NVQ levels were an accomplishment for some classes and college courses.

After GCSE’s, you choose your A Levels if you wish to continue education, and can continue in 6th form, usually a non uniformed section of education at the same secondary school, or to a college.

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Most of the people I know call it preschool mainly because that is what the place called itself but maybe it’s just to do with where you are?

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Nursery is from any ages, so it covers 0-5 years in its entirety and if more of a learn by play/daycare kind of thing.

Preschool is usually 3-5 years and follows a more school like structure, to prepare those children who are going into reception the following year.

At least that’s the way I’d always known it around here :woman_shrugging:t3:

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From what I remember I went to preschool for two years and started primary school when I was 4 so I must have started preschool when I was 2

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