Episode story tips?

Hi, i’m fairly new to writing episode stories so if anyone has any tips or tricks for me please let me know!

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First of all, overlays will help you do almost everything that the preset animations and backgrounds can’t.

&overlay OVERLAY_NAME create
&overlay OVERLAY_NAME opacity %
&overlay OVERLAY_NAME shifts to X Y in zone Z
&overlay OVERLAY_NAME scales to 1.000 1.000
@overlay OVERLAY_NAME moves to layer L

This, spot directing, and zooms will add the dynamics to the visual parts of your story and make it that much better. Be careful using these though. Used incorrectly, and you could have giant characters or zooms on noses. I suggest first becoming familiar with the basic directing commands, then slowly incorporating these components in as you get more comfortable.

Also, @DaraAmarie has some great tutorials for you as you want to explore new ways to improve your story.

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thank you so much!

  • Watch Joseph Evans tutorials first
  • Plan the story first
  • Plan every important character behavior down, so their behavior doesn’t keep changing through the story
  • Make a cover that will attract readers
  • Use backgrounds that aren’t made by Episode only
  • Make choices that affect the plot
  • Make episodes that are at least 10 minutes or more
  • Find a title that fits the story
  • Write a good description that will make people want to read your story
  • Write a contest story so people will acknowledge you and your story which will be helpful in the future when u write a story that’s not for a contest
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My big tip, which I see a lot in new authors is, rather than using AND in one big long line to direct multiple characters at once (e.g. @CHAR 1 walks to spot x in x in zone x AND CHAR 1 faces right AND CHAR 2 walks to spot x in x in zone x AND CHAR 2 faces right and so on so on…) - you can tidy up your script by using & instead of @ to simultaneously direct characters at the same time. E.g.

&CHAR 1 walks to spot x in x AND CHAR 1 faces right
&CHAR 2 walks to spot x in x AND CHAR 2 faces right

And when you want the simultaneous directing to stop, you can use the @ command for the last character if that makes sense.

E.g.

&CHAR 1 walks to spot x in x AND CHAR 1 faces right
&CHAR 2 walks to spot x in x AND CHAR 2 faces right
@CHAR 3 walks to spot x in x AND CHAR 1 faces right

Using the ampersand symbol as your simultaneous coding is going to clear your script right up and organize it in a way that you will be able to easily identify errors instead of looking through bulks of paragraphed text.

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Hey there! I think my thread would be just perfect for you :blush:

Writing an Episode story 101 - The key to success

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