How do you feel about using bullies mean girls or homophobic characters for stories


#1

I have a new story that features an LBGT character whos afraid to come out because his friend is homophobic. Her dad broke up with her mom for a man she’s in pain and hate him for it so she’s rude to gays. Someone said I can’t user her as a storyline. What do Y’all think?


#2

Honestly ? Bad idea. For me.


#3

Hmm I’m not sure, but as long as she learns something and at the end she acceptes it, and the story has some meaning behind? As long as you are not offending anyone or anything, soo I’m really not sure if it is a good idea to do that…

Cuz you may offend or hurt someone along in the way…


#4

Honestly I think it’d be fine, Sadly that’s the reality for some people. I think if you could write a story that could encourage people in the lgbt community to come out, and be themselves, then i think I’d be alright to write your story.


#5

Why do you say that?


#6

She said even if she learns from her mistakes we can’t like her it’s like a man who beats his wife just because he stops were supposed to like him now according to her.


#7

Learning from mistakes is what makes us human, It’s not about being liked it’s about learning and growing. I hardly think it’d be the same if a man beat his wife.


#8

As long as she’s not the main character, you’ll be alright. It happens in real life, but make sure you don’t make it seem forgivable. You’ll want to make the negative impacts of her homophobia clear. Acknowledge that even when she’s learned her lesson (which she should), her friend still has every right to stay angry at her, and he’s under no obligation to keep or fix their friendship. Most importantly, include a content warning mentioning that the story deals with homophobia, since LGBT+ people don’t always want to read about things we already have to deal with on a daily basis.

If she is the main character, I wouldn’t recommend it, since a lot of readers would find it impossible to sympathize with her, or even care what happens to her. While likeability isn’t the be-all-end-all of what makes a good protagonist, you’re more likely to keep readers if we don’t hate the main character.

Things like homophobia can be a challenge to write about. If you’re still feeling up to it and want to make your portrayal a little more complex, I recommend giving this article a read.


#9

^ I totally agree with all of the aforementioned points. A suggestion I have – if you do decide to portray the character as homophobic – is to depict microaggressions rather than blatant examples of homophobia. Almost all people take issue with someone claiming all gays are going to Hell, or advocating against LBGTQ+ rights, etc., but many people don’t understand the countless microaggressions people in the LGBTQ+ community face every day. Maybe have the friend say seemingly innocuous yet patronizing things like, “You’re too pretty to be gay,” “You don’t act gay,” “_____ is gay too, maybe you guys should get together,” “You don’t have a crush on me, right?” I’m essentially suggesting that maybe the homophobic character can express her homophobia in a discreet yet still very harmful way via microaggressions, which many LGBTQ+ people face every day but have less support in fighting against such encounters because society at large doesn’t see these to be homophobic when, in fact, they really are.


#10

Really, it just depends on how you write them, and how they’re portrayed.

There’s nothing wrong with making bad people sympathetic, but don’t lose focus on the message. Try to make sure the reason is valid, but still not treated as justification for anything hateful they do/say.


#11

This situation I would say as long as he gets through that and shows how he’s better off now.
Maybe he drops her and gets rid of all other toxic people or he makes her realize that lgbt people are just normal people, but with different interests.

People reading might be able to relate and feel like they deserve to be accepted so they accept themselves for who they are.


#12