Information/Questions about Asians, Muslims, Latinas/Latinos, Mental Illnesses, and more

Hey guys, it’s me again.
Some of you know my thread Let’s remove the toxicity. There I announced a project. For this project I need all the help that I can get.

If you are educated about following topics, please feel free to share information (outfits ideas for specific cultures, religions, languages, etc) with us.
If I forgot a very important topic, feel free to call me out. I know that I haven’t included every topic.

-> Asian Culture (Asian Cultures)
General information, What to avoid, What to include, Clothing, Appearance, Languages, Religions

I’m aware that Asians aren’t just from China. There are several other countries (India, a part of Russia, Thailand, Korea, etc). AND I’M AWARE THAT NOT EVERY ASIAN HAS BLACK HAIR/ SMALL EYES/ PALE SKIN

-> The Islam/Muslims (Muslims and their clothing)
General information, What to avoid, What to include, Clothing, Appearance, Languages,…

Clothing for a muslim character

Make sure to check this thread out!
Clothing for a muslim Character

Questions about the Islam/Muslims (Feel free to ask more questions)

Is it a big problem if a muslim marries a non-muslim man? (Question by @line123462)
Yes, it’s forbidden. But she can marry a non-Muslim man under one condition. If he converts to Islam other wise they can’t get married. (Answer by @Perry)

Do Muslims HAVE to get married? (Question by @GennieG)
No, Muslims are not FORCED to get married. Some old-fashion families have that rule, which I think is stupid. Most Muslims get married bachelor-style. Basically, when a man sees a woman and likes her, his mom has to call her mom and ask her hand in marriage. Then they get to know each other, and after that they get married. It’s actually a stupid way tbh, but we are not forced to get married that way. You don’t have to get married if you don’t want to. (Answer by @mariam_episode)

We are not forced to marry! We can have gf and bf as long as we don’t have sex with them. We’re not allowed to until marriage. But she or he can fall in love! (Answer by @Perry)

What if the women doesn’t want to marry the man that likes her? (Question by @GennieG)
It’s not a big deal. She can just reject him. But sometimes the parents are retarded and they will force their daughters to say yes, but that is a rare case. Also, usually women don’t ask men for their hand in marriage, it’s usually men that ask. The wedding is usually at the bride’s house, and after that the bride either moves in with the groom at his house which he shares with his family, or they can get a new house for themselves. (Answer by @mariam_episode)

About Muslims/The Islam by @Perry (full credit to her)

General Information
Muslims are not terrorists. Islam isn’t a race. Islam is the religion of peace and equality. Some people say Islam is controlling women but no instead Islam protects women and gives them their rights!
Being a muslim doesn’t mean you have to wear hijab. A lot of muslim girls don’t wear hijab but we should but we still don’t wear hijab until we are ready!

Avoid making muslims drink alchohol and have sex or make out before marriage. Muslim girls aren’t allowed to fall in love with non-Muslim guys! But guys can fall In love or marry a non-Muslim guy

If you want to know why exactly

Why can’t Muslim girls marry non-muslim guys?

Also avoid making a girl take off her hijab in front or random or close guys!
Muslim girls only take their hijab off when they’re alone/with girls only/ with husband, dad , brother only!!

Avoid making a hijab girl show skin or wear very thight clothes.

Muslim girls don’t flirt with guys but ofc they are girls and think guys are cute and these stuff.

If you want a muslim girl to love a non-muslim maybe make him convert to islam for her because he wants to marry her and be with her.

Include that muslims always pray 5 times a day but not really necessary with details. Muslims think everything through before doing something to see if it’s a sin or haram or halal. That doesn’t mean that there are bad muslims who drink alchohol and disobey their religion but in the end the find the right way and become better people and closer to god.

Muslim guys wear like any other guys and they’re allowed to be shirtless. But girls who are Not hijabi should wear clothes that doesn’t show much skin but can wear anything as long as it’s appropriate.
For hijabi girls they wear a hijab or scarf and never take it off in public. They wear clothes that are not thight and doesn’t show their body curves or skin. Long dresses only ofc and long pants. But ofc they can put makeup on!!

Muslims all around the world speak whatever language they have in their country but they pray/ read quran in arabic.

That’s it if anyone has any questions they can DM @Perry !

About Muslims/The Islam by @mariam_episode (full credit to her)

Hi! I can help with the muslim part. Avoid making all Muslim characters wear a hijab or long skirts and stuff like that because it’s kind of old fashioned. Not all Muslim girls wear a hijab, some actually wear inappropriate clothes sometimes, it all depends on how “religious” they are. But to stay on the safe side, make them wear normal clothes, it’s okay if their arms show, and it’s sometimes okay if their legs show, maybe limited to the knees. But try not to show cleavage or stomach. Muslim girls are alo allowed to wear makeup. Muslims can’t eat three things: pork, alcohol, and blood. Having sex with someone you are not married to is haram, so is kissing or touching or doing anything like that to the opposite sex, so try to avoid that. Also, please don’t attack me, same sex marriages are also not allowed, so a Muslim character can’t be gay. (Please don’t attack muslim people, we are not homophobic. We are not allowed to be gay, but we respect gay people and will not insult anyone for being gay. Being Muslim doesn’t make you homophobic. That’s just a stereotype and it’s wrong.)

-> African (African American/African…) Culture (#BlackLivesMatter)
General information, What to avoid, What to include, Appearance, Languages,…

-> Mental Ilnesses
General information, What to avoid, What to include

I see following information as very helpful, especially for the Episode Community.

Guidelines For Writing About Mental Health

1. Use words that end stigma, not perpetuate it.

Words matter. Certain words carry a great deal of weight for particular groups, even when those terms aren’t intended to be disparaging. But we have the power to change the conversation and reduce stigma by steering clear of derogatory language like nuts , lunatic , deranged , psycho , and crazy when referring to people.

These words and other phrases (elaborated below) reinforce stereotypes about mental illness and could discourage people from seeking treatment. And content creators should focus on individuals and how terminology can affect them personally.

2. Put people first.

Use person-first language (the person’s name or the terms person or people before a condition) to avoid phrasing that could be seen as defining someone by their illness: a person with schizophrenia rather than a schizophrenic person .

Subtle differences like this can influence both how people perceive themselves and how they are perceived by others.

3. Avoid using diagnosable conditions in a nonclinical sense.

Casual conversation and jokes can trivialize real disorders: “The weather was bipolar”; “She was OCD about organizing her arts and crafts”; “I’d rather kill myself than listen to one more minute of this lecture”; “I’m going to have PTSD after watching this scary movie.”

These expressions not only dilute the power of these words, but they could also discourage people who desperately need to be heard from vocalizing their despair.

Tip: Pairing “so” with a diagnosable disorder — “I’m so OCD about my bullet journal”; “My roommate is acting so bipolar this week” — should be a red flag that you should reword: “I’m obsessed with my bullet journal”; “My roommate is so moody this week.”

4. Respect the difference between an emotion (sad) and a mental disorder (depression).

Are you really “depressed” because your favorite team didn’t make it to the playoffs? No: You’re disappointed , but it’s a temporary feeling. Many people with depression can’t identify a “reason” for the symptoms they are experiencing.

Did watching the close game give you an anxiety attack? You were probably nervous or anxious, but unlike someone with an anxiety disorder, your agitation didn’t keep you from your normal routine.

5. Avoid euphemisms, be precise, and use value-neutral terminology.

Avoid phrases like suffer from (which denotes pity and can mischaracterize how someone is managing their illness) and battling (bellicose language creates a perception of “winners” versus “losers” and oversimplifies a person’s experience — is someone not “fighting hard enough” if they don’t get well?).

For example: “She has schizophrenia” (not “She suffers from schizophrenia”); “He is being treated for depression” (not “He is battling depression”).

Avoid generalizations like “She is mentally ill.” Mental illness is OK to use as a general term, but specific conditions should be used when possible (“She has bipolar disorder”). Do not use the term the mentally ill .

6. Be wary of conflating mental illness with violence or criminal activity.

Researchers have found that most violent crimes are wrongly linked to mental illness in news reporting. In fact, according to the US Department of Health and Human Services, people with mental illnesses are 10 times more likely to be victims of crimes than the general population.

And if a mental illness isn’t relevant to the story, don’t include it.

7. Do not equate being transgender with having a mental illness.

As the American Psychological Association points out, “Many transgender people do not experience their gender as distressing or disabling, which implies that identifying as transgender does not constitute a mental disorder.”

That said, anti-trans discrimination, hostility and intolerance, and assault may cause transgender people to experience anxiety, depression, or related disorders.

8. When reporting on suicide, avoid specifying the method or including details about how the person died.

Explicit descriptions can “increase the likelihood of suicide in vulnerable individuals,” according to Recommendations for Reporting on Suicide, whose guidelines are based on more than 50 international studies on suicide contagion.

9. Never use the verb commit when referring to suicide.

Although “committed suicide” is a pervasive term, commit can carry a criminal or negative moral connotation. Instead, BuzzFeed uses direct phrasing — “She killed herself” — and, aside from direct quotations, avoids the euphemistic “She took her own life.”

Never describe a suicide attempt as “unsuccessful.”

10. Unless it’s a news report, include information about mental health resources, such as a suicide prevention hotline, in a story about suicide.

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. Other international suicide helplines can be found at befrienders.org.

-> Lgbt+
General information, What to avoid, What to include

Here is some general information that might be helpful.

LGBTQ+ ABC (Something like the "basics")

Credit to Cosmopolitan

Ally (or allies): Usually a straight and/or non-trans person who supports the LGBTQ+ community.

Asexual: A person who doesn’t feel sexual attraction.

Aromantic : A person who experiences little or no romantic attraction to others.

Bisexual (or bi): An umbrella term that describes an emotional, romantic and/or sexual orientation towards more than one gender.

Biphobia: The fear or dislike of a person who identifies as (or is perceived to be) bisexual based on prejudice or negative attitudes, beliefs or views about bi people.

Cisgender (or cis, or non-trans): A person whose gender identity is the same as the sex they were assigned at birth.

Coming out: When a person tells someone about their LGBTQ+ identity.

Deadnaming: When a trans person who has changed their name as part of their transition is called by their birth name.

Gay: A man who has an emotional, romantic and/or sexual orientation towards men. It’s also used as a generic term for lesbian and gay sexuality. And, some women define themselves as gay, rather than lesbian.

Gender dysphoria: When a person experiences discomfort or distress because there’s a mismatch between their sex assigned at birth and their gender identity. It’s also a clinical diagnosis for someone who doesn’t feel comfortable with the gender they were assigned at birth.

Gender expression: How a person chooses to outwardly express their gender, within the context of societal expectations of gender. A person who does not conform to societal expectations of gender may not, however, identify as trans.

Gender identity: A person’s innate sense of their own gender, whether male, female, non-binary (see below), or something else. This may or may not correspond to the sex assigned at birth.

Gender reassignment (or gender confirmation): A way of describing a person’s transition, usually meaning to undergo some sort of medical intervention. It can also mean changing names, pronouns, dressing differently and living in their self-identified gender.

Heterosexual (or straight): A person who has an emotional, romantic and/or sexual orientation towards people of the opposite gender.

Homosexual: Largely considered a more medical term used to describe someone who has an emotional romantic and/or sexual orientation towards someone of the same gender. ‘Gay’ is now more generally used.

Homophobia: The fear or dislike of someone who identifies as (or is perceived to be)lesbian, gay or bi , based on prejudice or negative attitudes, beliefs or views about lesbian, gay or bi people.

Intersex: Used to describe a person who may have the biological attributes of both sexes, or whose biological attributes do not fit with societal assumptions about what constitutes male or female. Intersex people may identify as male, female or non-binary.

LGBT: The acronym for lesbian, gay, bi and trans.

LGBTQ+: The acronym for lesbian, gay, bi, trans, queer and other identities.

Lesbian: A woman who has an emotional, romantic and/or sexual orientation towards women.

Non-binary: An umbrella term for a person who does not identify as only male, or only female, or who may identify as both.

Outed: When a lesbian, gay, bi or trans person’s sexual orientation or gender identity is disclosed to someone else, without that person’s consent.


Pansexual
:
A person whose emotional, romantic and/or sexual attraction towards others is not limited by biological sex, gender or gender identity.

Pronoun (or gender pronouns): Words used to refer to people’s gender in conversation - like, ‘he’ or ‘she’. Some people may prefer others to refer to them in gender neutral language and use pronouns such as they/their and ze/zir.

Queer: In the past, it was a derogatory term for LGBTQ+ individuals. It’s now been reclaimed by LGBTQ+ people who don’t identify with traditional categories around gender identity and sexual orientation. But, it’s still viewed as derogatory by some.

Questioning: The process of exploring your own sexual orientation and/or gender identity.

Sexual orientation: A person’s emotional, romantic and/or sexual attraction to another person.

Trans: An umbrella term to describe people whose gender is not the same as, or does not sit comfortably with, the sex they were assigned at birth. Trans people may describe themselves using one or more of a wide variety of terms, including (but not limited to) transgender, transsexual, gender-queer (GQ), gender-fluid, non-binary, gender-variant, crossdresser, genderless, agender, nongender, third gender, two-spirit, bi-gender, trans man, trans woman, trans masculine, trans feminine and neutrois.

Transgender man: Used to describe someone who is assigned female at birth, but identifies and lives as a man. This may be shortened to trans man, or FTM, an abbreviation for female-to-male.

Transgender woman: Used to describe someone who is assigned male at birth, but identifies and lives as a woman. This may be shortened to trans woman, or MTF, an abbreviation for male-to-female.

Transitioning: The steps a trans person may take to live in the gender with which they identify. Each person’s transition will involve different things. For some, this involves medical intervention (such as hormone therapy and surgeries), but not all trans people want - or are able - to have this. Transitioning also might involve things like telling friends and family, dressing differently and changing official documents.

Transphobia: The fear or dislike of someone based on the fact they are trans, including the denial/refusal to accept their gender identity (or use their correct pronouns).

Transsexual: Used in the past as a more medical term (similarly to homosexual) to refer to someone who transitioned to live in the ‘opposite’ gender to the one assigned at birth. It’s still used by some, although many people prefer trans or transgender.

What you should keep in mind

Credit to Quora

  • Develop them the same way you’d develop any other character. Don’t make the fact that they’re LGBT affect how you develop their character. They are still human, with thoughts, dreams, desires, fears, personality traits and much, much more. Like any other character, beware stereotypes as well; or alternatively, poke fun at them if you want to have a bit of a harmless laugh, such as a gay man wearing tights or leggings and saying “If you tell me I look gay, then I’ve done my job right!”
  • Don’t make their queerness be their defining feature. Even if you’re writing about their discovery, coming-out or dating/sex experience, don’t make the plot revolve around them being LGBT. Give them other traits to come with it to make them not just an LGBT character, but an LGBT character with individuality . For example, one of my characters is FTM transgender, and I tend to focus more on his life in school, the gym and ice rink, and running around his city, rather than solely his trans life. Also, try to blend their LGBT lives with their other features so that you don’t solely focus on that LGBT factor and nothing else.
  • Treat them like you would any other person. Unless your setting is a homophobic society, don’t make your character seem oppressed or special-snowflake-like. This sort of story about being a special snowflake with an angst overload just gets on my nerves.
  • Remember, unless it’s an LGBT society, no one introduces themselves as an LGBT person. Saying “Hey there, I’m gay” is just downright weird. Most LGBT people tend to be casual with their sexuality. In my own personal experience, I only bring up my bisexuality when it’s relevant to the conversation. Make your character do the same.
  • Finally, if in doubt, consult other LGBT people, or just anyone in general who’s accepting of LGBT people. Show snippets of your work to others and ask for honest feedback. If you’re a bit shy about that, then try searching online for blogs and articles that talk about LGBT portrayal. I believe that anyone, straight or not, can write an LGBT character accurately if they put the effort in.
Stereotypes that you should avoid

Credit to Quora

  1. Killing off your gay characters for drama.
    This kind of comes from back in the days where books could be forbidden from being distributed for featuring gay people without “punishing” them for it by the end of the story. In modern times, it’s become less of a way of dodging censorship and more of a way for straight people to profit off of our suffering by way of tragedy-porn. The community would very much appreciate the author letting our representative characters get a happy ending.
  2. Treating homosexual love as something to be ashamed of.
    Even if it’s something as simple as having the characters refer to their same sex romances as “naughty” or “sinful,” it can really give off the wrong message.
  3. Portraying trans people as caricatures.
    It’s one thing to make a trans person not yet transitioned, but it’s another to make them a caricature of the sex they were born with. Trans people much prefer to be treated as the gender they identify with, and there are more tactful ways to show that someone is trans (like a brief mention of hormone treatments, binders, or packers, for instance).
  4. Bisexuality = Promiscuity
    Just because bisexuals have more options, in a sense, it doesn’t mean they screw around with more people than any other sexuality. It’s also entirely possible for a bisexual person to only have a history of dating only the one sex.
  5. Asexuality = Emotionless robot.
    For as little as asexual people are acknowledged as existing in media, it’s not unusual for an asexual person to be mistaken for not feeling love just because we don’t experience sexual attraction. An asexual person can actually have a lasting relationship, whether romantic or platonic, without too much difficulty (personally speaking, I worry about the integrity of relationships that rely too much on sex to survive; this could prove to be a good exercise of your writing ability if you can write a close non-familial bond that isn’t based on sex).
  6. Associating certain sexualities to specific races.
    If your process of determining a character’s race is intertwined with their sexuality or vice versa, then you’re kind of missing the point. For example, some people like to make their Latino women characters bisexual, which is fine until they start portraying that woman as a wh@re. My advice would be to determine stuff that isn’t really important to the plot with rolling dice, so it has random chance, like in real life.
Things that you should avoid part 2

Credit to Quora
Not every gay man is sassy and fashionable, not every lesbian is super butch or super femme, not every bisexual sleeps around, pansexuals and polysexuals aren’t fake, asexual/aromantic people exist, not all trans people dress to “fit” their gender (there are many masculine woman and feminine men), and genderqueer people exist, we aren’t fake or a phase. We don’t all wear binders, have short brightly colored hair or look ambiguou. Many of us are fairly masculine and feminine.

Next, we have than enough sad stories about queer people being rejected and discriminates or who they are. They are enough “"discovering” that they are queer. Don’t make the stories focus on the sexuality and/or gender of a character; it’s a part of them, not the only thing about them. They don’t all need sad back stories, we need positive representation.

An important thing to remember is: NOT ALL QUEER PEOPLE ARE WHITE, THIN, AND ABLE BODIED. There are more poc who are queer than are represented in Literature and media. There are queer disabled people, both physically and mentally. Not everyone is a super model, so don’t make them all thin. There are many queer people who are Muslim, Jewish, Christian, atheist, etc. People of all ages, religions, races, body types, and backgrounds are queer.

Do NOT make queer characters token characters; It’s not realistic if only one character is queer while the rest are cisgender and straight.

Above all else, treat the character as a person. Their sexuality isn’t the only thing about them. They have interests, hobbies, and quirks. They are NOT just the sexuality or gender. So dont focus on that; instead, focus on making them a relalistic character, and work out sexuality/gender later.

->(Racist) Stereotypes that you often see in Episode stories (or in the community/world itself)
Stereotypes like “All asians look the same”, “All Italians are in the Mafia” (This are stereotypes that I’ve found in Asian Cultures)

Again, if I forgot an important topic, tell me.
I’ll add every information as an edit in this message, so that it can be found easier.

Side Note: I’m also creating an extra account (on instagram) for education. I’ll announce the “opening” of the account on my main @epy.nina (THIS IS NOT SELF-PROMO BTW)

16 Likes

I would like to know more about mental illness

Everything in this text about Mental Illnesses is copied from https://www.buzzfeed.com/drumoorhouse/writing-about-mental-health?utm_source=dynamic&utm_campaign=bfsharecopy (full credit to this website)
I see the page as very helpful, especially for the Episode Community.

Guidelines For Writing About Mental Health

1. Use words that end stigma, not perpetuate it.

Words matter. Certain words carry a great deal of weight for particular groups, even when those terms aren’t intended to be disparaging. But we have the power to change the conversation and reduce stigma by steering clear of derogatory language like nuts , lunatic , deranged , psycho , and crazy when referring to people.

These words and other phrases (elaborated below) reinforce stereotypes about mental illness and could discourage people from seeking treatment. And content creators should focus on individuals and how terminology can affect them personally.

2. Put people first.

Use person-first language (the person’s name or the terms person or people before a condition) to avoid phrasing that could be seen as defining someone by their illness: a person with schizophrenia rather than a schizophrenic person .

Subtle differences like this can influence both how people perceive themselves and how they are perceived by others.

3. Avoid using diagnosable conditions in a nonclinical sense.

Casual conversation and jokes can trivialize real disorders: “The weather was bipolar”; “She was OCD about organizing her arts and crafts”; “I’d rather kill myself than listen to one more minute of this lecture”; “I’m going to have PTSD after watching this scary movie.”

These expressions not only dilute the power of these words, but they could also discourage people who desperately need to be heard from vocalizing their despair.

Tip: Pairing “so” with a diagnosable disorder — “I’m so OCD about my bullet journal”; “My roommate is acting so bipolar this week” — should be a red flag that you should reword: “I’m obsessed with my bullet journal”; “My roommate is so moody this week.”

4. Respect the difference between an emotion (sad) and a mental disorder (depression).

Are you really “depressed” because your favorite team didn’t make it to the playoffs? No: You’re disappointed , but it’s a temporary feeling. Many people with depression can’t identify a “reason” for the symptoms they are experiencing.

Did watching the close game give you an anxiety attack? You were probably nervous or anxious, but unlike someone with an anxiety disorder, your agitation didn’t keep you from your normal routine.

5. Avoid euphemisms, be precise, and use value-neutral terminology.

Avoid phrases like suffer from (which denotes pity and can mischaracterize how someone is managing their illness) and battling (bellicose language creates a perception of “winners” versus “losers” and oversimplifies a person’s experience — is someone not “fighting hard enough” if they don’t get well?).

For example: “She has schizophrenia” (not “She suffers from schizophrenia”); “He is being treated for depression” (not “He is battling depression”).

Avoid generalizations like “She is mentally ill.” Mental illness is OK to use as a general term, but specific conditions should be used when possible (“She has bipolar disorder”). Do not use the term the mentally ill .

6. Be wary of conflating mental illness with violence or criminal activity.

Researchers have found that most violent crimes are wrongly linked to mental illness in news reporting. In fact, according to the US Department of Health and Human Services, people with mental illnesses are 10 times more likely to be victims of crimes than the general population.

And if a mental illness isn’t relevant to the story, don’t include it.

7. Do not equate being transgender with having a mental illness.

As the American Psychological Association points out, “Many transgender people do not experience their gender as distressing or disabling, which implies that identifying as transgender does not constitute a mental disorder.”

That said, anti-trans discrimination, hostility and intolerance, and assault may cause transgender people to experience anxiety, depression, or related disorders.

8. When reporting on suicide, avoid specifying the method or including details about how the person died.

Explicit descriptions can “increase the likelihood of suicide in vulnerable individuals,” according to Recommendations for Reporting on Suicide, whose guidelines are based on more than 50 international studies on suicide contagion.

Although BuzzFeed News never mentions the method in a headline or on social media, it will be noted in the running text when it is specifically relevant to the story — e.g., this story about Chris Cornell’s autopsy results.

9. Never use the verb commit when referring to suicide.

Although “committed suicide” is a pervasive term, commit can carry a criminal or negative moral connotation. Instead, BuzzFeed uses direct phrasing — “She killed herself” — and, aside from direct quotations, avoids the euphemistic “She took her own life.”

Never describe a suicide attempt as “unsuccessful.”

10. Unless it’s a news report, include information about mental health resources, such as a suicide prevention hotline, in a story about suicide.

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. Other international suicide helplines can be found at befrienders.org.

1 Like

Can I learn more about LGBTQ+

Muslims are not terrorists. Islam isn’t a race. Islam is the religion of peace and equality. Some people say Islam is controlling women but no instead Islam protects women and gives them their rights!
Being a muslim doesn’t mean you have to wear hijab. A lot of muslim girls don’t wear hijab but we should but we still don’t wear hijab until we are ready!

Avoid making muslims drink alchohol and have sex or make out before marriage. Muslim girls aren’t allowed to fall in love with non-Muslim guys! But guys can fall In love or marry a non-Muslim guy

If you want to know why exactly

Why can't Muslim girls marry non-muslim guys?

Because in Islam the kids follow the religion of the father. So if you marry a non-muslim your children will be non-Muslims as well and you will feel odd and may get confused or leave islam and convert to whatever other religion. But guys can marry non-muslim girls because the kids will follow his religion which is Islam.

Also avoid making a girl take off her hijab in front or random or close guys!
Muslim girls only take their hijab off when they’re alone/with girls only/ with husband, dad , brother only!!

Avoid making a hijab girl show skin or wear very thight clothes.

Muslim girls don’t flirt with guys but ofc they are girls and think guys are cute and these stuff.

If you want a muslim girl to love a non-muslim maybe make him convert to islam for her because he wants to marry her and be with her.

Include that muslims always pray 5 times a day but not really necessary with details. Muslims think everything through before doing something to see if it’s a sin or haram or halal. That doesn’t mean that there are bad muslims who drink alchohol and disobey their religion but in the end the find the right way and become better people and closer to god.

Muslim guys wear like any other guys and they’re allowed to be shirtless. But girls who are Not hijabi should wear clothes that doesn’t show much skin but can wear anything as long as it’s appropriate.
For hijabi girls they wear a hijab or scarf and never take it off in public. They wear clothes that are not thight and doesn’t show their body curves or skin. Long dresses only ofc and long pants. But ofc they can put makeup on!!

Muslims all around the world speak whatever language they have in their country but they pray/ read quran in arabic.

That’s it if anyone has any questions they can dm me!
DON’T READ THE BLURRED PART IF YOU GET TRIGGERED OR OFFENDED EAISLY!!

Islam don’t support gays / lesbians / transgenders but muslims were ordered to respect them under any circumstances but they can’t support it.

3 Likes

hi i’m zero ! i am trans nonbinary and use they / them pronouns, and i’ve dealt with severe mental illness and trauma nearly my entire life. if you need help or information on lgbt issues or mental health issues then i’m happy to help ! mental illness is especially stigmatised on episode which i rlly hate but i don’t know how to fix it so spreading real information could be a start (:

is it a big problem if a muslim woman marry a non-muslim man?

1 Like

I can help with LGBTQ+

Yes, it’s forbidden. But she can marry a non-Muslim man under one condition. If he converts to Islam other wise they can’t get married.

that seems wrong to me,

1 Like

Added something important I forgot to mention and please don’t read if you get triggered easily!

Are you replying to me? Sorry I am confused :pleading_face:

Hi! I can help with the muslim part. Avoid making all Muslim characters wear a hijab or long skirts and stuff like that because it’s kind of old fashioned. Not all Muslim girls wear a hijab, some actually wear inappropriate clothes sometimes, it all depends on how “religious” they are. But to stay on the safe side, make them wear normal clothes, it’s okay if their arms show, and it’s sometimes okay if their legs show, maybe limited to the knees. But try not to show cleavage or stomach. Muslim girls are alo allowed to wear makeup. Muslims can’t eat three things: pork, alcohol, and blood. Having sex with someone you are not married to is haram, so is kissing or touching or doing anything like that to the opposite sex, so try to avoid that. Also, please don’t attack me, same sex marriages are also not allowed, so a Muslim character can’t be gay. (Please don’t attack muslim people, we are not homophobic. We are not allowed to be gay, but we respect gay people and will not insult anyone for being gay. Being Muslim doesn’t make you homophobic. That’s just a stereotype and it’s wrong.)

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yeah i was sorry thought i had hit reply

I get its a diffren coloutur, and as an atheist myself and my entire family also is athiest I dont have understand regligon or the rules burden and expactasion their comes with it, all I can say is from an outside it just dosent seem right.

but I highly doubt islam is the only reglion their prohibit to marry outside of it.

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another muslim enterd the chat

so what is your opinion on a woman marry outside the regligion

I’m the only atheist in my family :sob:

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tecnology we are christian, but litarraly all we do is get baptised and that is about it. regligion dosent have any part of our family, not even at christmas, that is more about elfs and santa clause

It’s not allowed. This is because men are normally the leader of the house (sexist I know) so usually the children would follow their dad, so it’s better if a woman marries another Muslim so their children will turn out Muslim. I honestly don’t like that rule, but it’s my religion so I have to respect it and marry a Muslim man. If he is not Muslim, he has to convert to Islam.

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You know every religion comes with its explanation as a muslim myself I see the reasons for the forbidden things are convincing.
For example :
You can’t drink alchohol because it effects your brain and you may get drunk to the point where you can harm yourself or commit a crime or do something wrong.

Also when they say women shall wear hijab because women are precious not easy. So that not every guy looks at their curves or give them silly hurtful comments! That annoys them.

Even tho, I am a muslim. I don’t wear hijab and i am not forced to do anything I don’t like.

You know what I mean?

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Yes exactly!