What does "#" mean?

Hi, if this is on a wrong category oh well… I apologize.

In this thread I have a question. So I’ve been reading threads about choices, and i noticed that some of the replies have this “#” on their “script template” Idk what’s it called :woman_shrugging:

Also credits to @TaraStar for the information below (you should check her out for more! :slight_smile: )

example

Labels and gotos

Before I talk about if/else systems, you need to be familiar with how to use labels and gotos. It’s a lot easier than it sounds. Essentially, a label is when you basically “name” part of the script and mark it out. Then, later on you can use a goto and this will allow you to return to the label you set up earlier, because the Script Writer then recognises that you “named” this part of the script earlier. It’s easier for me to show you what I mean. Let’s say we’re doing a choice scene.

choice
“Go to the park!”{

}”Go to the swimming pool!”{

}

That looks simple enough. But then, how would you be able to let the reader go to the scene of their choice? If it’s only a short scene, you could add the scene into the choice branch. But then, you can’t have labels and dressing games in a choice. So, you could use labels and gotos:

choice
“Go to the park!”{
goto park_play
}”Go to the swimming pool!”{
goto pool_play
}

After using the goto command, you would then underneath the choice have to have this:

label park_play
#your scene and dialogue here, however long you want the scene to be

goto end_play

label pool_play
#your scene and dialogue here, however long you want the scene to be

goto end_play

So what does “#” mean and what does it use for?

Thanks in advanced! :blush:

1 Like

Read this:

You can read about script commands here: Script Symbols/Commands and What They're Used For

2 Likes

Thanks you so much!
I was confused at first, so your reply helped alot!
:orange_heart::orange_heart::orange_heart:

No problem :smile: :sparkling_heart:

1 Like

Sorry I didn’t clarify in my articles! The # sign is essentially what authors use to write notes to themselves - it doesn’t actually do anything (so it causes no dialogue to appear, no action or choice or anything at all). It literally is just a note to the author, so when you re-read your script you can add in things or read your notes to remember what you were doing. So the # in the above article where I spoke about “your scene and dialogue” is just me telling whoever is reading the article that that is where you would write a scene/dialogue. That’s all it means :slight_smile:

1 Like

@Jeremy can you close this thread as well? :sweat_smile::sweat_smile:

1 Like

Closed at the request of the mighty potato! :grin: