What is Your way of coding?

I’d like to know how you fellow authors write your script. I normally layout the scene, add the music and then write the dialogue. I do advanced coding as I go. I’ve heard that others first write dialogue throughout the story then add in the advanced coding. I feel as if this is better because if I don’t like my scene I’ll have to delete so much hard work :sweat::joy: But I’ve learnt to code this way so it’d be weird to change.

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I usually write down the dialogue and the general scene set on a sheet of paper and then code everything

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i go on google docs write out the dialogue…then a little note of like a sense of background i want to use and if its really important or like if i really want to have it a little note reminding me i need to add that certain script template there

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Nice! That’s a really good way of doing it

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I’ve thought about doing it this way. Nice to have it all on the PC

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yeah dont get me wrong i love pen and paper i have notebooks upon notebook and buckets just for markers and pen and pencils BUT when it comes to something that is going to be lengthy and end up being re written on a computer…i rather save my notebooks for something else instead of wasting papers on all my mistakes :grimacing::grimacing::grimacing:

Very true! Coding wouldn’t be too good on paper but I have one small notebook where I write down ideas when I’m away from the computer so I don’t forget and if I’m just brainstorming.

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same or like if im listening to a certain song…and it gets me in a mood i just take a screenshot of my screen so when its time to write that scene i’ll re listen to that song

Wow that’s awesome! I love when a song you’re listening to sets a scene. That’s a good way to really get into it.

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I do the directing and dialogue together and once I’ve finished with everything, then I add music as I like to listen to my own or even listen to true scary stories whilst writing. I kinda just write as I go along too

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Usually I go scene by scene. Like, making sure a scene is completely done with dialogue, directing and sound before I move to the next one. I used to add sound once I had finished the whole episode, but now I’m finding it easier to add it in as I go.
Occasionally, if I’m feeling really lazy or unmotivated, I will write dialogue only and then just add in directing the next day. It’s not my preferred way of coding, but at least I get something done and feel like I’ve actually made some progress :woman_shrugging:

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same

It changes with time.
Right now I’m writing 2-3 episodes at the same time.

  1. Usually set up scenes with all overlays and plan what will happen in whole episode. Everything is sloppy (speechbubbles, dialogues etc.) just to see the whole plot for future episodes. I do it to know the lenght of the chapter. If it’s too short or long, I mix, move and add smaller scenes and dialogues.
  2. Extending dialogues, adding bigger choices.
  3. Mixing scenes again to have final 2-3 episodes content.

Then I polish every single episode and when I finish one, I start another:
4. More zooms/overlays.
5. Improving scenes, extra dialogues, pauses, transitions, proofreading.
6. Adding little choices and sounds.
7. Testing.
More or less :slight_smile:

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I usually code the scenes and the dialogue first then I review that, and I direct it, then I add the music and intros and outros. I usually plan which backgrounds I use tho just so I know like the amount of coding it will take and the amount of time as well.

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@OreoBiscuit
I find that I work this way too. Just a huge wave of coding at once haha

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Holy moly! I’d get very confused and disoriented. Well done haha it seems you get those chapters out and flying quick quick lol. But a very good way of doing it. Everything is spaced and well thought out

I do the same, part from the sounds/music. I like to do Dialogue and Directing each scene before adding music/sound. I just go through the chap I’ve done and add any sound or music I need for that scene. ATM I’m not working on it until I have the net.

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:smiley: It sounds complicated but it’s easier to not stick with one idea and not attach to single scenes that can ruin overall plot. It’s also easier when you have a few timelines. Sometimes people just write the plot down on paper and can plan it before everything. It didn’t work in my case, some scenes were far longer than I expected, I had additional ideas, some scenes were unnecessary and I needed to delete it… I decided it’s easier to go with flow so now I don’t make a detailed script in document I just code ii.

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That’s very true. Now that I think about it, it’s not that confusing. I’ve made the mistake of adding a scene that ruined future chapter ideas and the plot in general. Thinking of using your method. Rather safe than sorry.

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I should do the dialogue and planning first but often I’ll just wing it, put in some general code, and then I go into more advanced coding as I go along.

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